About2018-03-28T13:56:49+00:00

About

When you visit the Chequers Inn you really will be experiencing a little bit of history.  Documented deeds for the Chequers Inn go back to 1695, distinguished by the chequered sign, originally hanging from the roofs eaves and the local sign probably originates from the fact that the Salt Exchequer Offices for the local salterns had their headquarters at Lower Woodside Green.

The history of salt making in Lymington dates back from late Saxon times. The Inn itself is situated next to the Salterns where the shallow pans specially constructed along the estuaries and marshes, can still be seen. Read more below.

History

The chequered sign, originally hanging from the roofs eaves represents probably the oldest in the world; a chequered sign was discovered during the excavations of the ruins at Pompeii. In early times it denoted houses where money transactions were carried out – and the local sign is likely to derive from the fact that the Salt Exchequer Offices for the local salterns had their headquarters at Lower Woodside Green.

Lymington has a centuries old history in salt making, dating back from late Saxon times. It fell in decline in the early years of the 19th century due to the burden of taxes on salt and coal, and hastened by the opening of rock salt mines in Cheshire which could be brought down by the railways. Technological improvements introduced in the production of salt from brine enabled production to be continued throughout the year so weather ceased to be a factor.

The Chequers Inn is situated next to the salterns where the shallow pans specially constructed along the estuaries and marshes, can still be seen. Two boiling houses survive though their role has changed, but there is little else to show of an industry that had once been of major economic importance for the people of Lymington and the surrounding area.

The Area

This wonderful, and lively town has so much to offer visitors and local’s alike. Steeped in history, with tales of smugglers, with its strong nautical links, picturesque harbour, and marinas, there is something for everyone. People travel from far and wide to see Lymington’s famous Saturday market.

Lymington is also the gateway to the Isle Of Wight with regular daily ferries connecting Lymington to Yarmouth.

The wonderful New Forest National Park is also easily accessible and provides visitors the opportunity to explore outstanding  scenery either on foot, by bike, or  by car.

Lymington is an interesting town with it’s focus on the river. With two marinas on it’s historical quay there is a lot of sailing activity and many yachts to see. On Saturdays you can enjoy the hustle and bustle of the market on Lymington High Street.

For those who want to venture further into the New Forest, there are some lovely walks to explore with ponies and wildlife to see. We are also not far from Southampton, Winchester and Salisbury.

Those who want to explore, we are not far from Adam and Eve Creek, Moses Dock and sea wall. You can also sit in our picturesque garden. The surroundings are peaceful with wildlife to see.

Location

The Chequers Inn
Ridgeway Lane
Lower Woodside
Lymington
SO41 8AH
Telephone: 01590 673415

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